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School Department News

Noonkester School of Arts and Letters

Monday, November 28, 2016 - 4:35pm
Nov. 29 – Dec. 15 at Lucile Parker Gallery
 
The Lucile Parker Gallery will feature an exhibit by Mississippi artist Kim Whitt beginning Nov. 29 and running through Dec. 15. The “Evolving by Nature” exhibit features Whitt’s paintings and weavings. The opening reception will be held from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 29. The gallery is located at 512 Tuscan Avenue on the William Carey University campus. Gallery hours are 1 to 4 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday or by appointment. Call (801) 755-4052 for more information or to schedule an appointment.
 
Kim Whitt has had a lifetime of involvement in the arts as a student, teacher, administrator, and artist in movement, fiber/textiles and painting. Whitt is a fiber artist and painter, holds a B.A. in cultural anthropology and dance from the University of Southern Mississippi with graduate studies in process pedagogy, and is certified to teach K-12 in visual and performing arts. 
 
Whitt taught creative movement, visual art and drama for 10 years, is a past Fellow member of the Mississippi Craftsman’s Guild as an accomplished textile artist, and has taught weaving to all ages, beginner to advanced. She also served as the arts education director for the Mississippi Arts Commission, overseeing visual artists, craftsmen and arts education programming for the state. 
 
Currently, Whitt works with abstract impressionist landscape painting in oil, exploring our intuitive sense of place through the use of color, line and shape. Inspired by Wolfe Kahn, Mark Rothko, and Color Field painting, she’s exploring the element of intersecting line and grid as evident in weaving. Both the paintings and the weavings work with object placement, as in still life, and a sense of place. 
 
Thursday, September 22, 2016 - 2:55pm

The William Carey University Theatre will present the award winning Lorraine Hansberry play “A Raisin in the Sun” October 6-8 at 7:30 p.m. and October 9 at 2 p.m. in the Joe & Virginia Tatum Theatre on the Hattiesburg campus.

 

“A Raisin in the Sun” tells the story of a black family living in a Chicago neighborhood who have received an insurance settlement that could change their lives for the better. Hansberry received the New York Drama Critics Circle award for best play in 1959. Her play has become a part of the American literary canon and is often mentioned when speaking about contemporary African American writers.

 

Living in a poverty stricken neighborhood in Chicago, the Youngers, Walter and Ruth, live with their child Travis, Walter’s mother Lena, and sister Beneatha. Financial difficulties strain their relationship, and Walter hopes to fix the strain by investing in a local store with friend Bobo. The family receives a small inheritance and Mr. Younger uses the bulk of the money to become a businessman, but Mrs. Younger takes some of the money to buy them a new and better home in a white neighborhood. A white resident, Karl, tries to buy the Youngers out of their dream home, which only leads to tension in the family. Adding to the tension are two of Beneatha’s friends, the wealthy George and Nigerian Joseph Asagai, who both vie for her hand in marriage. The Youngers must decide as a family their fate as an uncertain future looms.

 

The cast includes Branden Lindsay of Greenville, South Carolina (Walter), Zhariah Hubbard of Hattiesburg (Ruth), Andric S. Knott of Hattiesburg (Travis), Treya Brown of Hattiesburg (Lena), Kelseigh Redmon of Murfreesboro, Tennessee (Beneatha), Damien Williams of Chunchula, Alabama (Bobo), Taylor Abbott of Picayune (Karl), Deshawn Weston of Desoto, Texas (George), Michael Jones of Denver, Colorado (Joseph Asagai), Nicoli Hutchison of Picayune and Nathan Wilkins of McComb (moving men). 

 

The scenic designer is visiting artist Connie Smith, director of technical theatre at Chipola College in Alabama. The costume designer is Johonna Bush of Foxworth, and the lighting designer is Amanda Campbell of Carriere. The sound designer is Dalton Stanford of Hattiesburg, makeup and hair designer is Nadia Triñanes of Hattiesburg, and Bryce Moore of Gulfport is properties director. The director is Keone Fuqua, chair of the department of theatre and communication. Stage manager is Chace Giadrosich of Beaumont.  

 

Tickets are $10 for general admission, $8 for military and senior citizens, and $5 for students. Reservations can be made by calling 601-318-6221. The box office is open Monday through Friday from 1 p.m. until 4 p.m. beginning October 3.

Wednesday, April 6, 2016 - 12:57pm
A support group for diabetics and pre-diabetics founded by William Carey University students and Dr. Josye Brookter, assistant professor of language and literature, will meet for the first time at Merit Health Wesley in Hattiesburg from 9 until 10:30 a.m. on April 9.
 
The group, part of a service-learning project for Brookter’s Expository Writing students, is called Peers for Wellness and will meet in the Glen Smith Room on the main floor of the hospital. The group, which will meet twice monthly after the first meeting, will explore topics related to health, exercise and meals.
 
In addition to planning the initial meetings, Carey English students have also used their writing skills to develop documents on healthy living and the management of diabetes.
 
The meetings are free and open to the public. For more information, call (601) 318-6619.
Wednesday, April 6, 2016 - 8:46am
Dr. Read Diket, chair of the Department of Art and professor of art and education at William Carey University, was recently awarded the Maryl Fletcher de Jong Service Award by the Women’s Caucus of the National Art Education Association.
 
The award, which is given annually, honors an individual in the field of art education who has made noteworthy service contributions to art education as an advocate of equality for women and all people who encounter injustice. This individual gives outstanding service of community, state, national or international significance that contributes to eliminating discriminatory gender and other stereotyping practices for individuals and groups.
 
Diket was nominated for the award by Dr. David Burton of Virginia Commonwealth University with letters of support from Dr. Robert Sabol of Purdue University and Dr. Sheri Klein, the president of the Women’s Caucus. Their letters presented aspects of Diket’s service, including her presidency of the Seminar for Research in Art Education and of the Women’s Caucus. Diket has also served as president of several American Educational Research Association groups, including arts and education and brain, neuroscience and education.
 
Appropriate to the award, the letters also highlighted Diket’s 17 years of work as leader of the art education university consortium for secondary analysis and interpretation of National Assessment of Educational Progress visual arts from 1977, 2008 and 2016. Diket also contributes to an international dialogue on leadership and will publish a Taylor & Francis Group book chapter in 2016 on the ideology of thought leadership in social media.
 
In her acceptance speech, Diket spoke of Carey and the climate for service that has been such a strong component in its community for learning. She mentioned that kindness and empathy are mediums of respect that lead to positive outcomes for students, events and work at the university. From childhood, these components have figured into Diket’s orientation to the world.
 
Additionally, on April 2, Diket presented at Penn State University a paper on “Living the Vision.” The occasion was the 50th anniversary of the seminar that reoriented education in the arts at schools. Creativity needs for the race into space, needs for defining the disciplines in art and a spirit of collaboration despite consternation marked the original seminar. 
 
Diket showed through her reading of the event papers, and through autoethnography, that national ideas found positive expression in Mississippi schools, and further, that Mississippians in the arts are known to contribute leadership within the national discussion.
Monday, April 4, 2016 - 1:41pm
Houston Saxon of Lumberton, a junior English and history major and philosophy minor at William Carey University, recently scored in the 100th percentile nationally on the Area Concentration Achievement Test for English.
 
The ACAT is administered as part of the coursework for ENG 498, a senior-level course, and assesses content knowledge and retention by students at the completion of their major field of study. The ACAT is a timed exam scored on an 800-point scale and acts as a comparison standard to some of the best undergraduate programs in the country.
 
Students who do well on the ACAT for English must be well-read in British and American literature. Sections on the ACAT for English include American to 1865; American Modern; British Medieval; British Renaissance; British Romantic Period; British Victorian Literature; Linguistics; Restoration/18th Century/Romantic; and Shakespeare.
 
Saxon scored a 779 on the exam, with perfect scores on the British Renaissance and Restoration/18th Century/Romantic sections. Other noteworthy sectional scores were a 740 in British Romantic and a 749 in Linguistics, although his scores were high on all sections.
 
“I’ve worked with students and the ACAT for more than seven years and we’ve had some great scores. However, Houston’s score was exceptional,” said Dr. Thomas Richardson, chair of the Department of Language and Literature. “The ACAT is taken without any specific preparation, other than degree coursework and a lifetime of reading and study. Having a student score in the 100th percentile shows his dedication to scholarship and we are so proud of him and his work.”
 
During the summer, Saxon will complete his graduation requirements, as well as enroll in courses in Latin through Louisiana State University’s distance learning program. After graduating from Carey in August, he will travel to Angers, France, for a semester of intensive study in French through the Consortium for Global Education. He hopes to apply for and be accepted into a post-baccalaureate program in classical studies in the fall of 2017.
 
“My ultimate goal is to be a writer of literature. To be a great writer and not have read thoroughly in the tradition is impossible. My scores show I have studied the various styles and aspects of English literature, making me a better writer,” said Saxon.