MESSAGE

School Department News

biological sciences

Monday, February 8, 2016 - 11:20am
Vivian Clark of Perkinston, a senior at the William Carey University Tradition campus in Biloxi, was recently awarded a $1,800 scholarship from the P.E.O. Sisterhood, an international philanthropic and educational organization promoting increased educational opportunities for women.
 
Clark, a psychology major and biology minor, was recommended for the nationally competitive award by the sisterhood’s Chapter M, which is based in Hattiesburg. The sisterhood’s Program for Continuing Education provides need-based grants to women in the United States and Canada whose education has been interrupted and who find it necessary to support themselves and their families.
 
The scholarship will help Clark, who also works in the Tradition campus education department, achieve her educational goals and ease the burden of expenses such as tuition, books and lab fees.
 
“We were inspired to sponsor Vivian for the scholarship due to her tenacity,” said Hanna Knowles, chair of the scholarship committee. “She had applied to several positions and had been turned away due to her level of education. This did not deter her, but rather pushed her to improve her qualifications.”
 
The sisterhood, founded in 1869 at Iowa Wesleyan College in Mount Pleasant, Iowa, has given more than $250 million in financial assistance to more than 95,000 recipients. For more information on the sisterhood, visit www.peointernational.org.
Friday, August 28, 2015 - 9:56am
A research team from William Carey University recently contributed their time and talents to the development of a self-cleaning glass cellphone screen protector.
 
The screen protector, called e-RACE, is a product of Reactive Surfaces Ltd. The company has offices, research facilities and manufacturing operations at the Accelerator, a business incubator owned by the University of Southern Mississippi. Dr. Tyler Hodges, an assistant professor of biological sciences at Carey, became involved with the project after meeting officials from the company during work at the Accelerator. Carey later received a $40,000 grant from the company to assist in the development of the screen protector and related products.
 
To assist in his work, Hodges recruited a team of student interns, including Carey students Allison Burnett, a graduate student in biological sciences from Gulfport; Jessica Posey, a senior biology major from Port Sulphur, Louisiana; Kyle Powell, a senior biology major from Hattiesburg; and Nick Anglin, a sophomore biology major from Ovett. Hodges and his team worked for over a year on the screen protector, which contains an all-natural enzyme designed to break down grease from a cellphone’s daily use.
 
“The enzyme breaks down oils and creates soap that helps remove fingerprints, oil from skin and other debris, like makeup,” said Hodges.
 
The Carey team worked on all aspects of the screen protector, from the laboratory science behind the enzyme to assistance with the product’s commercialization and final packaging. The team worked closely with USM’s Thames-Rawlins Research Group in all aspects of the project, as well as with researchers from the Mississippi Polymer Institute.
 
“It was an opportunity for the students to receive experience in many areas,” said Hodges. “It was also a great opportunity for students to be exposed to science outside of the traditional classroom setting.”
 
Steve McDaniel, CEO of Reactive Surfaces, said he was pleased to work with Hodges and the team of Carey students.
 
“Dr. Hodges has contributed significantly to the commercialization and launch of this first product,” said McDaniel. “Reactive Surfaces has also been very pleased with the student interns program, under which it has supported the work of several Carey students to give them hands-on experience in a commercial laboratory setting.”
 
The e-RACE protector is on sale now for iPhone models 5, 6 and 6 Plus. For more information or to purchase, visit www.reactivesurfaces.com/products/e-race-screen-protectors/.
Tuesday, April 21, 2015 - 10:15am
The William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine hosted the 2015 Research Symposium on April 17 with Dr. Stefanie Jeffrey of Stanford University as the keynote speaker.
 
Dr. Jeffrey, Stanford's chief of surgical oncology research and the John and Marva Warnock professor, joined three Carey faculty members in presenting lectures throughout the symposium. Her lecture topic was "Liquid Biopsy in Cancer." Following Dr. Jeffrey's lecture, Dr. Italo Subbarao, associate dean of pre-clinical sciences at the Carey College of Osteopathic Medicine, presented "Using Twitter Effectively to Prevent Injury and Deaths from Disasters."
 
Dr. Tyler Hodges, assistant professor of biological sciences, presented "Bioactive Surfaces and Their Applications," followed by Dr. Maude McGill, instructor of nursing, presenting "Increasing Dietary Phosphorous Knowledge and Adherence Among Adult Hemodialysis Patients through Peer Mentoring."
 
The lectures were presented free of charge and open to the public. Prior to the lectures, Carey students and faculty members from the medical college, the School of Nursing and the Master of Biomedical Science program competed in a research poster contest. The contest featured four categories, including graduate, medical, nursing and undergraduate. 
 
First place winners in the graduate category were Danielle Hagler and Justina Boles, students in the biomedical science program, for their poster, "Antimicrobial Peptides for Pathogen Reduction." Winners in the medical category were David Buford, Nabil Baddour, Allina Espinosa, Iben McCormick-Ricket and Dr. Subbarao for "An Evidence-Based Review of Resilience in Communities in the Face of Oil Spill Disasters."
 
Winning the nursing category was Denise Hancock, assistant professor of nursing, for "Leaving Academia: Work Experiences and Career Decisions of Former Nurse Faculty." Winning the undergraduate category was Pearl Ugwu-Dike, a senior biology major, for "Cross-Regulation Between the Notch Signaling Pathway and the Activin Signaling Pathway in the Ovary."